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February, 2013

Kareem and the Unsyncables

Thursday, February 28th, 2013

February, 2013

Kareem Does the Harlem Shake
With the Cast of ABC’s “SPLASH”

Tuesday, February 26th, 2013

February, 2013

Remembering Dr. Buss

Monday, February 25th, 2013

February, 2013

Congrats to Eddie Doucette

Monday, February 25th, 2013

Eddie Doucette 'Skyhook'

Broadcaster Eddie Doucette recalls the birth of his term ‘sky hook’
By Bob Wolfley of the Journal Sentinel
Feb. 21, 2013

Sky hook, the shot, was made famous by Kareem Abdul-Jabbar.

Sky hook, the term, was coined by former Milwaukee Bucks announcer Eddie Doucette, who is to be inducted into the broadcasting wing of the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in September.

In a recent telephone interview, Doucette described the genesis of the term.

According to Doucette, the sky hook was born on May 10, 1974 at Boston Garden in Game 6 of the NBA Finals between the Bucks and Celtics.

Milwaukee won in double overtime, 102-101, to tie the series and send it back to the Milwaukee Arena for Game 7.

The shot that won the game was the first time Doucette used the term sky hook. Oscar Robertson inbounded high sideline right to Abdul-Jabbar who was above the foul line. He looked to pass, but found no one open. He faced Finkel, took a dribble to the baseline and lofted a hook shot.

“He got the ball in rhythm,” Doucette said. “It was as beautiful thing. A perfect pass, the way you are supposed to deliver it. So he had to take only one step and go up.”

Finkel was guarding Kareem because Dave Cowens had fouled out, Doucette said.

At Boston Garden, Doucette was not seated courtside as radio broadcasters many times are in NBA venues. He was up in the first balcony.

Had he not been seated there, the term sky hook might never have made its entrance.

“When he went to that baseline and went up for that shot, it was kind of almost eye level with me,” Doucette said. “It felt that way. Everything became slow motion when he went up for that shot on the baseline. Took it in stride. Went up off his left leg. Perfect balance. Right hand fully extended. Ball on the fingertips. Launched that shot. And as he launched it, it just hit me. ‘That ball is coming out of the sky. That’s a sky hook.’ That’s how it happened. I never gave it any thought. But I had to be in a position where I was located that would inspire me to think that it would be coming out of the sky.”

“It was beautiful,” Doucette said. “It was arched. His form was textbook. Every kid who is a big man should study how to shoot that shot. It’s unstoppable. He executed it in art form and we won the game.”

February, 2013

Django Is Wonderful.
But It Shouldn’t Be Up for Best Picture.

Friday, February 22nd, 2013

By Kareem Abdul-Jabbar for Esquire.com

Calvin Candie (Leonardo DiCaprio)

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar: “Basically, Django Unchained is a B movie. A damn fine B movie, but still a B movie.”

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar: “Basically, Django Unchained is a B movie. A damn fine B movie, but still a B movie.”

Everyone knows the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences sometimes gets it wrong. The proof is when they overlooked me for my heart-wrenching role as the troubled navigator with a mysterious past in 1980’s Airplane!. Clearly, too subtle for them. Then again in 1985 when I played Fifth-Floor Guardian in Game of Death. Sure, the Third-Floor Guardian got all the laughs, and the Sixth-Floor Guardian got to cry, and the Men’s Room Guardian got tips, but my role was the thematic core of the film. Plus, I’d like to see Don Cheadle or Samuel L. Jackson take on Bruce Lee. They’d have gotten their asses kicked! Which brings me to Django Unchained. And why the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences got it wrong.

First, let’s get this straight: I liked Django Unchained and have been recommending it to everyone. It’s gritty and lively and filled with entertaining scenes. It zigs when you think it will zag, and, as with all Quentin Tarantino movies, it has flashes of brilliance. The character of Stephen (Samuel L. Jackson), the malevolent house slave who is the real brains behind the plantation, is an inspired creation. His smug compulsion to destroy the innocence and humanity that he has lost but sees in others echoes the best of villains from Harry Lime in The Third Man to John Claggart in Billy Budd. (And Samuel L. Jackson as Stephen? He’s no Fifth-Floor Guardian, but he deserves an Oscar. As do Jamie Fox, Christoph Waltz, and Kerry Washington.)

But should Django have been nominated by the Academy for Best Picture and Best Original Screenplay Oscars? No. Not unless the Academy starts new categories such as Most Entertaining Movie or Best Kick-Ass Movie or Movie I Most Wish I Was In. Until then, the Academy members have a responsibility to promote films that demonstrate the highest quality on both a technical and literary level.

(more…)

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